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  • 601 AA NSHA 2b
    601 AA NSHA 2b

    601 AA NSHA 2b

    Peppermint Puddle, polymer sculpture

    This piece is created entirely of polymer clay. It began with the creation of a solid-colored cuff that was baked just long enough to make it stable. I then created a piece of clay "fabric" that I draped and arranged over the edges of the cuff to give the illusion of folded fabric caught at a moment in time. The entire piece is then baked.

    For more than 15 years, I have been working with clay that looks like fabric . I have applied pieces of fabric-like clay to canvas to create work that hangs on the wall. The pieces in this application, and others in a similar vein, represent a new approach to creating faux fabric sculptures. People seeing them for the first time often want to try to lift the "fabric" off of the supporting structure.

  • Lorrene Baum-Davis
    Lorrene Baum-Davis

    Lorrene Baum-Davis

    Raven Wannabe (No 27)

    This whimsical creature has high hopes of becoming stronger and bolder. Not human nor a raven, but something in between.

    Can you hear him think…? “When I grow up….?”

    He has the combination of the human spirit going forward and the innocence of a woodland creature. His mask indicates his dreams…. As we humans dress the role.

    He is created out of polymer clay over spun cotton armatures, craft wire, oil paints and acrylic details. The textures on the surface were made by my own hand-carved polymer feather stamps.

    He is Number 27 in my one of a kind whimsy ornaments.
  • Ken Reed
    Ken Reed

    Ken Reed

    The Crown of Love

    Inspired by the song of the same name by Arcade Fire.

    The crown is in the form of an ancient Greek boar’s tusk helmet which readies the wearer for the Battle of Love.

    The crown is ringed by twelve square panels with illustrations of various aspects of love, under red glass, bursting thru. On top, a hand holding a heart emerges from a golden egg, amid the swirl of tusks. Cheek panels and chin strap complete the helmet.

    Premo, glass, digital images, cord, egg and cardboard forms
    9"l x 7"w x 10"h

  • Georg Dinkel
    Georg Dinkel

    Georg Dinkel

    The Rat Ship ( Das Rattenschiff)

    The Rat Ship was inspired by a nef. A nef is an extravagant table ornament and container used in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, made of precious metals in the shape of a ship. If not just used for decoration, it could hold salt, spices, cutlery, or even napkins.

    The only member of the Rat Ship’s crew is the helmsman, who has a mechanical device for creating a current of air used to move the ship and two control sticks to navigate his track-laying vehicle.

    The cargo is a pack of (maybe infected) rats to be brought to new territories.

    I used a thin metal armature for the ship’s body and wood and thread to stabilise the mast. The rest is made of polymer clay and metal powders.

    Size: LxBxH 40x30x18cm ( 16"x12"x7“)

  • Fran Abrams
    Fran Abrams

    Fran Abrams

    Turquoise Splash - polymer sculpture

    This piece is created entirely of polymer clay. It began with the creation of a solid-colored cuff that was baked just long enough to make it stable. I then created a piece of clay "fabric" that I draped and arranged over the edges of the cuff to give the illusion of folded fabric caught at a moment in time. The entire piece is then baked.

    For more than 15 years, I have been working with clay that looks like fabric . I have applied pieces of fabric-like clay to canvas to create work that hangs on the wall. The pieces in this application, and others in a similar vein, represent a new approach to creating faux fabric sculptures. People seeing them for the first time often want to try to lift the "fabric" off of the supporting structure.

  • Deb Hart
    Deb Hart

    Deb Hart

    Armadillo on the Town

  • Laurie Mika
    Laurie Mika

    Laurie Mika

    Shoe Shrine

    In Mexico, one can often find many objects that are covered in Milagros. Milagros, meaning miracle, are small metal charms that are traditionally used for healing purposes and are often attached to altars, shrines and sacred objects as a way of giving thanks for an answered prayer. My shoe shrine is an homage to this tradition. I took a vintage shoe form and covered it with polymer clay and then made many of my own milagros out of polymer. This votive offering is for my husband who is healing from foot issues!

    Wood shoe form, polymer clay, milagro's, jewelry parts, found objects, charms. 7.5 x 3 inches

  • Ken Reed
    Ken Reed

    Ken Reed

    The Hermit

    Face of an old man emerging from a nautilus shell, the beard extending like tentacles.

    Inspired by a Medieval margin illustration of a rabbit jousting while riding a snail with an old man’s head (from The Breviary of Renaud de Bar, Metz, 1302).

    Premo, Inka Gold, aluminum foil core. 7"l x 3"w x 4.5"h

  • Ken Reed
    Ken Reed

    Ken Reed

    What we salvaged after this morning's troubles

    I was experimenting with forming polymer clay over a plaster life mask of myself. The first attempt cracked badly. I was subsequently able to make the technique work, but I wanted to put the “failed” attempt to use. I did a polymer version of the Japanese kintsugi ceramic repair technique, and liked the results.

    Premo, gold liquid clay, cloth, wire. 7"w x 48"h x 4"h

  • Claire Fairweather
    Claire Fairweather

    Claire Fairweather

    POPPY

    This mosaic picture of a poppy interprets the theme ‘To Boldly Go’ in terms of war. In the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, artificial poppies are worn on Remembrance Day or ANZAC Day, to commemorate those who bravely died in war. Poppies bloomed in between trench lines and ‘No Man’s Land’ on the Western Front, due to the extreme ground disturbance in warfare during World War 1. This is because the poppy is a coloniser, an annual plant that boldly goes forward, spreading itself by growing on disturbed ground.

    Polymer clay mosaic on MDF board with acrylic paste for grout. Dimensions: 12 x 12 inches (30 x 30 cm)

  • EvaMarie Törnström
    EvaMarie	Törnström

    EvaMarie Törnström

    Amon Amarth

    Amon Amarth is a Swedish melodic death metal band with lyrics that mostly is about Viking mythology and history. When I saw them att Sweden’s biggest Music Festival Bråvallafestivalen in the summer of 2016 the very powerful music challenged my mind to create an explosive and powerful Viking horse that with the help of a fierce raven (a very important bird in Norse mythology) kind of exploded out from a pit of ferocious snakes, that also looked like flames from a fire. Even if I liked the concert, I had to leave, I had to find my way out of the enthusiastic crowd to get some paper and a pencil to make the first sketches. For almost a year I have been afraid of creating this sculpture because of the risk that it should not express power and boldness in the way I wanted it to. Now here it is…

  • Laurie Mika
    Laurie Mika

    Laurie Mika

    Love Grows Here

    This sculptural piece contains an anatomical heart that I created using a mold I made from a ceramic heart I found in Mexico. Many of my pieces show the influence that my travels to Mexico have had on my work. I often use sacred hearts as a traditional symbol but here the anatomical heart brings more personal meaning. Vines and flowers grow out of the heart muscle while a bird nests atop, symbols of rebirth and regeneration. The Latin banner that wraps the heart says, Art for Art's Sake and speaks to my passion for creating for the pure joy of it.

    Wood substrate, polymer clay, jewelry parts, found objects. 3.5 x 7 x 4 inches

  • Ann Mitchell
    Ann Mitchell

    Ann Mitchell

    Title: Fallen Flower

    Dimensions: Polymer clay wall art, 9 ¼” H x 7 ¼” W

    To Boldly Go….Fallen Flower is a complete departure from my day to day polymer clay jewelry work. For inspiration I perused the many photos I have taken of flowers in botanical gardens. I wanted the look of a painting with three-dimensional form, a flower with stamens still reaching for the sky. The mosaic background has the feel of the ground and other plants blurred by the camera lens when the flower is in focus. Wall piece is done in a combination of solid and liquid polymer clay, with toothpick armature in the stamens.

  • LaLa Ortiz
    LaLa	 Ortiz

    LaLa Ortiz

    El Corazón de El Yunque (The Heart of the Rainforest)

  • EvaMarie Törnström
    EvaMarie	Törnström

    EvaMarie Törnström

    Banyan Tree Horse

    In April this year I visited Hawaii for the first time in my life. It was one of the most wonderful and greatest experiences in my life. This visit made a total change of my way of thinking and from now a part of my soul will always be Hawaii – Aloha and Mahalo. One of the amazing signature trees of the Hawaiian islands is the banyan tree. This very special sort of fig tree made a great impression on me. These trees are characterized by aerial prop roots that mature into thick, woody trunks, which can become indistinguishable from the primary trunk with age. The most impressive banyan tree I saw was located in the Courthouse Sqare in Lahaina in Maui. It is the largest banyan tree in the United States. When I studied the winding and twisting branches and roots I saw that this could also be seen as a horse. So i created one. A banyan horse.

  • LaLa Ortiz
    LaLa Ortiz

    LaLa Ortiz

    Ode to Ernst

  • Laurie Mika
    Laurie Mika

    Laurie Mika

    The Hand of Mysteries

    Inspired by the art of alchemy, I enjoyed adding my own symbols to the hand, though I didn't stray far from the original alchemical symbols that depict the transformation of man into god, the apotheosis. It is also sometimes referred to as The Hand of the Masons because it was a secretive tradition among Masons and was used as an opportunity to learn secret knowledge. It was said that in deciphering these symbols that divine power and regeneration was brought to the one who received this honor. I used astrological symbols and added the all seeing eye in the center of the hand which floats on a black background etched with navigational lines.

    Wood substrate, polymer clay and found objects. The eye was hand painted on a limpet shell. 6 x 11 inches

  • Joyce Cloutman
    Joyce Cloutman

    Joyce Cloutman

    Saint Nick of Assisi, North Pole

    After an exhausting trip around the world, Nick loves coming home to the uncondtional love of all the animals that he and the elves share at the North Pole. Saint Nick and Maxx graciously agreed to pose for me. Sculpted from polymer clay around a foil and wire armature finished with a patina of oil paint and pastels then embelished with tiny jingle bells standing at six and one half inches tall.